Super-High Protein Butter Chicken

My version of the Indian classic Butter Chicken is a high protein dream.  Combine chicken breasts, Greek yoghurt and nut butter and you get a whopping 52g of protein a portion!

AND my version actually has butter in it (not a lot, but enough..) whereas many healthier versions call themselves ‘butterless’ Chicken.  It STILL manages to have only 15g of fat a portion.

I always assumed that Butter Chicken was difficult to make, but I recently did an Indian cooking class with Rupen Rao when he was visiting Scotland and this was one of the dishes we made.  I’ve adapted Rupen’s recipe slightly to cut down on fat (Rupen’s more authentic version calls for chicken thighs rather than breasts, dried fenugreek leaves which you need to get from an Indian supermarket rather than ground fenugreek and cream instead of nut butter).

A note on the nut butter:  in the video you will see that I used cashew butter.  Indian cooking often uses ground cashew nuts as a thickener so I was trying to be authentic.  BUT in my practice run I used peanut butter (as I didn’t have any cashew) and it actually tasted better.  Plus it’s cheaper and easier to find.

The recipe & full macros (calories, protein, fat & carbs breakdown) can be found in my book High Protein Classics.

Download it as an eBook for only £1

or

Get the paper version on Amazon 

Thai Sweet Potato Fishcakes

Thai Sweet Potato Fishcakes

These fishcakes are incredibly tasty and packed full of Thai flavours.  This recipe makes plenty for 1 person or would be ideal as a starter for 2.  Serve with a wedge of lime and some sweet chilli sauce.

 

The recipe & full macros (calories, protein, fat & carbs breakdown) can be found in my book High Protein Classics.

Download it as an eBook for only £1

or

Get the paper version on Amazon 

Chicken Jambalaya

This is a super-easy one-pan meal, which means that there is no need to spend ages washing up afterwards.  It is ideal to make if you are meal-prepping as it will keep for a couple of days in the fridge.

Macros (per portion, excluding greek yoghurt)

387 calories | 24g protein | 8g fat | 56g carbs

The full recipe is included in my book High Protein Classics – order it here.  

I also made this recipe live on my Facebook page, see it here.

 

Fluffy Coconut Protein Pancakes

These are just lovely to make on a relaxed weekend morning.  Serve with some fruit and a little maple syrup (tip:  if you use a zero calorie syrup, you can keep the macros of your breakfast super low).

Macros

372 calories | 23g protein | 23g fat | 18g carbs

The full recipe is included in my book High Protein Classics – order it here.  

High Protein Cauliflower Pizza

Making cauliflower pizza used to be messy and time-consuming:  you had to blast the cauliflower in a food processor, microwave it and then squeeze out all of the water.  But now that all of the big supermarkets sell cauliflower rice/couscous/whatever-you-want-to-call-it, it’s easy.   Because the cauliflower has been blasted long before you’ve got it home and opened it up, it’s had time to dry out.

Another secret to getting your cauliflower base crispy rather than soggy is to add some coconut flour, which soaks up moisture like a sponge.

The recipe & full macros (calories, protein, fat & carbs breakdown) can be found in my book High Protein Classics.

Download it as an eBook for only £1

or

Get the paper version on Amazon 

Chilli con Carne

This version of Chilli con Carne has only 300 calories per portion (without the rice), a massive 33g of protein and only 7g of fat!  It will store well in the fridge for a couple ahead.  You can make a big batch, portion it out and heat it up for a quick high protein meal.

As any steak aficionado will tell you, fat creates flavour.  This means that when want to keep the fat and calories low by using very lean mince, you really have to pack in the flavours in other ways.

And this recipe certainly does:  the combination of spices such as chilli, cumin and paprika combined with beef and tomatoes hits the spot.  There is no need to cook the chilli for a long time but leaving it to sit for at least 10 minutes after cooking will make it taste even more amazing.

The recipe & full macros (calories, protein, fat & carbs breakdown) can be found in my book High Protein Classics.

Download it as an eBook for only £1

or

Get the paper version on Amazon 

 

Healthier Sweet & Sour Chicken

Like Crispy Chilli Beef, Sweet & Sour Chicken is a Chinese takeaway classic.  Here is a healthier version, without the oily batter and without the MSG.  This recipe is plenty for two people when served with rice – it doesn’t keep well so you are best to eat it straight after cooking it.

The recipe & full macros (calories, protein, fat & carbs breakdown) can be found in my book High Protein Classics.

Download it as an eBook for only £1

or

Get the paper version on Amazon 

 

Easy Fish Pie

This quick and healthy fish pie is based on a Jamie Oliver recipe that has been tweaked over the years.  Usually I make it with sweet potato as you can get away with less oil, but I think it tastes even better with white potato.

Unlike most recipes for fish pie, this version uses no cream, butter or bechamel sauce.  Instead it uses olive oil and cheddar cheese but still manages to come in at below 500 calories a portion.

Any mix of smoked and unsmoked fish will be perfect for a fish pie.   You can go as luxury or as budget as you want.  And a chopped up hard boiled egg works really well too.

The recipe & full macros (calories, protein, fat & carbs breakdown) can be found in my book High Protein Classics.

Download it as an eBook for only £1

or

Get the paper version on Amazon 

 

Easy Pad Thai

I love a good Pad Thai.  But in the past when I’ve looked up recipes for it, I’ve been put off by the need for exotic ingredients, such as salted radish and palm sugar.  Speaking of sugar, I was also a bit scared to find out just how much of the sweet stuff is actually in the dish (you may remember the headlines from a few years back which suggested that Pad Thai contains more sugar than a chocolate bar).

I am not a chef and have no desire to traipse around ethnic shops to look for fancy ingredients.  As I assume that many others are like me in this respect, when it comes to creating recipes, I try to only use ingredients which are easy to find in the supermarket.  As a result, this may not be the most authentic version of Pad Thai (the carrot is probably not very Thai) but believe me, it tastes really good.

Instead of using lots of noodles, I’ve bulked things up by using more veg (hence the carrot), which keeps the calories down.  I’ve left out the salted radish and used regular sugar instead of palm sugar (which is available in my local supermarket but is stupidly expensive).  I tried leaving the sugar out altogether, but I discovered that adding just half a teaspoon per serving really does transform the dish (demerara sugar is a better substitute for palm sugar if you happen to have any).

A few tips on stirfrying:

  • slice all of your ingredients as thinly as possible (but don’t cube them as they will burn)
  • prepare everything you will need in advance and keep it close to the stove
  • unless you are going to use lots of oil, use a good non-stick wok
  • the wok should be really hot before you add any of the ingredients (and should remain on high heat until any liquid is added)
  • you need to stay in front of the wok and stir continuously – don’t wander off!

The recipe & full macros (calories, protein, fat & carbs breakdown) can be found in my book High Protein Classics.

Download it as an eBook for only £1

or

Get the paper version on Amazon